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What are containers and why do you need them?

What are containers and why do you need them?Docker exploded onto the scene in 2013, and it's been causing excitement in IT circles ever since.

The application container technology provided by Docker promises to change the way that IT operations are carried out just as virtualization technology did a few years previously.

Here are answers to 13 of the most common questions related to this technology.

What are containers and why do you need them?

Containers are a solution to the problem of how to get software to run reliably when moved from one computing environment to another. This could be from a developer's laptop to a test environment, from a staging environment into production, and perhaps from a physical machine in a data center to a virtual machine in a private or public cloud.

Problems arise when the supporting software environment is not identical, said Docker creator Solomon Hykes. "You're going to test using Python 2.7, and then it's going to run on Python 3 in production and something weird will happen. Or you'll rely on the behavior of a certain version of an SSL library and another one will be installed. You'll run your tests on Debian and production is on Red Hat and all sorts of weird things happen."

And it's not just different software that can cause problems, he added. "The network topology might be different, or the security policies and storage might be different but the software has to run on it."

How do containers solve this problem?

Put simply, a container consists of an entire runtime environment: an application, plus all its dependencies, libraries and other binaries, and configuration files needed to run it, bundled into one package. By containerizing the application platform and its dependencies, differences in OS distributions and underlying infrastructure are abstracted away.

What's the difference between containers and virtualization?

With virtualization technology, the package that can be passed around is a virtual machine, and it includes an entire operating system as well as the application. A physical server running three virtual machines would have a hypervisor and three separate operating systems running on top of it.

By contrast a server running three containerized applications with Docker runs a single operating system, and each container shares the operating system kernel with the other containers. Shared parts of the operating system are read only, while each container has its own mount (i.e., a way to access the container) for writing. That means the containers are much more lightweight and use far fewer resources than virtual machines.



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